5 Interesting Facts About the New "Godzilla" Movie

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American nuclear weapons testing results in the creation of a giant radioactive monster called Godzilla, a seemingly unstoppable, dinosaur-like beast awakened from its slumber to wreak destruction on its creators. How can this monster be stopped?
Photo Credit: Warner Bros.
May 13th, 2014

When Warner Bros. announced that it was going to reboot the classic "Godzilla" series of movies, many creature feature fans were hopeful. It had been several years since the last film, and considering all of the advances in movie technology, the time was perfect for a new monster franchise to make its debut. Since the release of dynamic new clips and trailers, even casual Godzilla fans are looking forward to the film. The following are five interesting facts about the new film to tide fans over until its release date.

Two New Monsters

Godzilla has faced many enemies over the years, and not all of them were human. Many films in the franchise were centered on the creature battling other monsters on land, sea and air. In "Godzilla," he faces two brand new monsters that were created just for this film. They are called Mutos or M.U.T.O.S., which stands for "Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Organism." The twist is that these creatures are no longer terrestrial, because they have wings and can fly.

The studio is trying to keep the Mutos under wraps to surprise audiences, so not a whole lot is known about them just yet. Based on exclusive footage viewed at various conventions, at least one of the two monsters has insect-like legs, which could mean a spider-like creature. The Mutos not only battle Godzilla, but also battle humans, cutting a huge path of destruction.

Keloid Scars

The original Godzilla creature was a mutated product born of atomic bomb radiation. He had rough skin that reflected injuries that are a hallmark of radiation survivors. In this newest update, the monster has many keloid scars across his body, a nod to the design of the original creature.

The Film Marks the 60th Anniversary of the First Godzilla Movie

The original "Godzilla" was released in 1954, so 2014 marks the 60-year anniversary. Original producing studio Toho in Japan vowed not to make another film for a decade after 2004's "Godzilla: Final Wars." Toho nearly broke its promise, because this particular reboot originally had a tentative release date of 2012. Due to a number of factors, including the firing of three producers and the desire to get the script just right, the release date was pushed back to 2014. Toho kept its promise not to release any new "Godzilla" films for a decade and just in time to mark the anniversary.

Family Drama

Most of the previous "Godzilla" films focused almost entirely on the monster and his ability to obliterate entire metropolitan areas in minutes. For the reboot, screenwriter Max Borenstein decided to have multiple plots that would eventually all tie together. There is family drama with Bryan Cranston starring as a scientist named Joe Brody, who worked in a nuclear facility 15 years earlier and witnessed a nuclear event that the government tried to cover up. He lost his wife (Juliette Binoche) in that same disaster so he has a personal vendetta against those who swept the incident under the rug.

Brody is the first to see some sonar anomalies that are the first hint Godzilla is coming. He tries to warn people to no avail, so for the rest of the film he is desperately trying to find a way to stop the creature, especially since his grown son Ford (Aaron-Taylor Johnson) is in the military and will have to face the creature head-on. The film divides time between the family drama of the Brodys, Godzilla and the two Mutos that are also causing chaos. All three plot threads are tied together by the end, when Godzilla takes on the Mutos, with the humans desperate to stop all three.

Man vs. Nature

Director Gareth Edwards has said in several interviews that "Godzilla" is an epic battle between man and nature, with Godzilla representing nature. The creature is the result of mankind messing with nature, so he is a punishment of sorts for all the things that humans have done wrong. Edwards has said that Godzilla is "the punishment we deserve" for trying to control nature, which is a force that cannot be controlled.

"Godzilla" appears to be a very well-balanced film as it pays respect to the history of the monster, while still updating the legend for modern day audiences. With an exciting director, a superstar like Cranston and all the special effects, many are predicting that the film will do blockbuster business at the box office. The world will find out just how accurate these predictions are when "Godzilla" opens in theaters on May 16, 2014.