Tom Hooper: Les Miserables is 'testosterone filled'

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Les Misérables is an adaptation of the popular stage musical based on Victor Hugo's classic novel. It is set in 19th-century France and revolves around a paroled prisoner named Jean Valjean who seeks redemption.
December 30th, 2012

Tom Hooper insists 'Les Miserables' will be a testosterone-filled cinema outing.

The filmmaker thinks his adaptation of the popular musical based on Victor Hugo's classic novel about the French Revolution is incredibly manly thanks to male leads Hugh Jackman and Russell Crowe's rivalry and bloody battle scenes.

He said: ''If you cast Hugh Jackman then you've got to cast someone who could get the better of him, that's tough. Russell Crowe is one of the few men that if you put them in a duel you'd go, oh, Russell might win. There's a lot of testosterone in it.

''You've got the Hugh Jackman-Russell Crowe rivalry. You've got incredible battle sequences. You've got the students and their cause. You've got some very hot women. What's not to like?''

Tom defended his choice of banning miming and choosing to film his actors breaking into song live by saying it flows naturally and while discussing Samantha Barks' vocal turn as love-struck Eponine, he explained that song was a very organic form of expression.

He explained: ''It's not dissimilar to watching a 3D movie. In a 3D movie, you actually forget you are watching a musical because you are inside the story... Sam is not singing it as a character aware of the history of that song. She's coming up with it spontaneously. This is how she is going to express herself.''

The director achieved phenomenal success with his last Oscar-winning film 'The King's Speech' and said he enjoyed watching people become captivated and engrossed in the raw emotions of the story, so sought to do the same with 'Les Miserables'.

He said: ''I watched ['The King's Speech'] with many audiences around the world and the most rewarding thing was how it made people feel. I felt like for my next film I was even more interested in provoking strong emotion in people. Rather than engaging them in an intellectual or ideological way.