Nicole Kidman didn't understand "Stoker" script

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A family drama and psychological horror thriller directed by Park Chan-wook and written by Wentworth Miller, Stoker stars Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Matthew Goode, Dermot Mulroney & Lucas Till. After India's (Wasikowska) father dies in an auto accident, her Uncle Charlie (Goode), who she never knew existed, comes to live with her and her emotionally unstable mother Evelyn (Kidman). Soon after his arrival, she comes to suspect this mysterious, charming man has ulterior motives, but instead of feeling outrage or horror, this friendless girl becomes increasingly infatuated with him.
February 27th, 2013

Nicole Kidman didn't understand 'Stoker' when she first read the script.

The 45-year-old actress claims South Korean director Park Chan-wook's new psychological thriller is so layered and complex she had to re-read the script - which was penned by 'Prison Break' star Wentworth Miller - several times before tackling her role since it relies so heavily on atmosphere and intricate cinematic details.

Speaking at a US press conference, she explained: ''I had to read it a couple of times to understand it. It's got a lot of subtext and layers, so I just wanted to absorb what the feeling was. I think the strength of director Park is his atmosphere.

''There's not a lot of dialogue so the cinematic language of it has to be very strong. It was extraordinary how detailed he wanted everything to be. His use of colour and sound is all very specific and it's not by chance.''

The flame-haired star believes the poetic film - which also stars Matthew Goode and Mia Wasikowska - defies conventional genres and admits she had no idea what director Park intended to do with most of the shots until she saw the eerie finished product.

She said: ''I'm not sure at what genre it fits into, it's hard to define it. I was amazed at the filmmaking, you don't seen that kind of thing that often. It's very layered and the metaphors that he uses - the hair thing - I had no idea!

'He was just like, 'We're just going to shoot brushing your hair, then I was like, 'Ohh!' [when I saw the film]. It's really hard to do and not be pretentious. You're taught that cinema is the language of images, you really should be able to tell the story without words.''

'Stoker' hits cinemas on March 1.