Paul Weitz 'content' to not make Being Flynn

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Ten years and two little Fockers later, Greg (Ben Stiller) has finally won the approval of his tightly wound father-in-law, Jack (Robert DeNiro). In this third installment of the comedy film series, he and Pam are planning to host a birthday party for their twins. Yet just as things seem to calm down, Greg's new job moonlighting for a drug company brings about a sexy co-worker (Jessica Alba) that arouses suspicion in Jack. The patriarch wants to appoint a successor to his family, but now he's wondering if his son-in-law could have a wandering eye.
February 28th, 2012

Paul Weitz would've been ''fairly content'' if he hadn't ever got to make 'Being Flynn'.

The 'American Pie' co-director enjoyed writing draft copies of the script for the movie - an adaptation of playwright-and-poet Nick Flynn's memoir 'Another Bulls**t Night in Suck City', detailing his reunion with his estranged alcoholic father Jonathan - so much so that he wouldn't have minded if the film had never reached the production stage.

He explained: ''I was sent the book eight years ago and then I spent seven years doing draft upon draft. I really like writing. I love directing, but I was actually fairly content with the prospect of continuing to write draft upon draft and never making it.

''That sounds weird, but in the same way that people like doing crossword puzzles I like juggling around the details of a story.''

Robert DeNiro - who worked with Paul in 'Little Fockers' - is starring as eccentric dad Jonathan in the movie, with Paul Dano taking up the role of Nick, who works in various homeless shelters in Boston in the 1980s and he eventually discovers Jonathan living in one.

But the 46-year-old helmer admits he had to stop drafting scripts eventually after the Focus Features studio ''called his bluff''.

He added to ComingSoon.net: ''If I didn't make it, I would never be confronted whether it was living up to what I thought it could be essentially. Then, at some point, it had gone through a couple of more mainstream studios and Focus Features called my bluff and gave me a much reduced budget number and said, 'If De Niro will still do this and you can make it work, then go ahead. Go to it.'

''So yeah, now I can't write drafts of it anymore.''