MRR Review: "X-Men: Days of Future Past"

Movie Description(Click Here To Hide)
The X-Men must travel in back in time and team up with their younger selves to change a major historical event that could globally impact both man and mutant kind.
4.5

Rating: PG-13
Length: 131 minutes
Release Date: May 23, 2014
Directed by: Bryan Singer
Genre: Action / Adventure / Fantasy

"X-Men-Days of Future Past" is a thrilling, action-packed sequel to "X-Men: The Last Stand" (2006), "X-Men: First Class" (2011) and "The Wolverine" (2013). Bryan Singer, the writer and director of "X-Men" (2000) and "X2" (2003), returns to helm this fast-paced and highly enjoyable new installment. Fans of the previous X-Men films will not be disappointed.

The seventh film in the X-Men series, "Days of Future Past" makes use of the wonders of cinematic time travel to combine the familiar actors from the original X-Men movies, such as Patrick Stewart as Professor X and Ian McKellen as Magento, with the younger versions of their characters, introduced in "X-Men: First Class." The result is a cleverly crafted and infinitely enjoyable movie.

Plot

In "X-Men: Days of Future Past," Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) travels to the past to alter the course of events in an attempt to protect the future. The movie begins in the year 2023. Mutant-hunting robots called sentinels are decimating the mutant population. To stop the slaughter of the mutants, the X-Men decide to send Wolverine 50 years into the past to try and stop the chain of occurrences that led to the start of the deadly sentinel program. To do that, Wolverine has to prevent Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) from killing Bolivar Trask, the military scientist who created the sentinels.

Back in 1973, Wolverine enlists the help of Professor X's younger self, Charles Xavier (James McAvoy). In order to carry out their mission, Charles and Wolverine must break Erik, the young Magneto (Michael Fassbender), out of the maximum-security prison where he is being held for murdering John F. Kennedy. Despite their animosity, the enemies need to combine their strengths to accomplish their common goal of stopping Mystique in order to preserve the future.

Cast

The cast of "Days of Future Past" is an extremely talented collection of award-winning actors. Golden Globe and Emmy winner Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine in both time periods. Wolverine is chosen to travel back in time because his regenerative healing powers make him uniquely able to withstand the strain. Jackman is every bit as remarkable in his role as Wolverine as he has been in each of the earlier X-Men films.

Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence is wonderful as the belligerent Mystique. The storyline begins to show her transformation into the villainous character from the original "X-Men."

One of the most satisfying aspects of "Days of Future Past" is the way the younger and older versions of the characters are intertwined. Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen never fail to impress in their roles as Professor X and Magneto. In turn, James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender are spectacular as the characters' younger selves, Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. The chemistry between McAvoy and Fassbender stands up to that of well-known off-screen friends, Stewart and McKellen.

Golden Globe winning "Game of Thrones" actor Peter Dinklage plays the part of Dr. Bolivar Trask, the man whose life the mutants must save.

Oscar winner Halle Berry (whose part was greatly reduced due to her pregnancy during filming) returns as Storm. Anna Paquin (also an Oscar winner), Ellen Page and Nicholas Hoult also make appearances.

Critique

"X-Men: Days of Future Past" is everything viewers want in an action movie. It has a clever story, likable and familiar characters portrayed by an excellent cast, and intense action sequences. Movie buffs love seeing noteworthy and acclaimed actors, such as Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Jennifer Lawrence and Hugh Jackman, having some fun and kicking some butt. The scene when the young Charles Xavier confronts his older self is extremely well done. Partially set in the Seventies, the movie takes advantage of all of the decade's hallmarks, from bad fashion and worse music to Richard Nixon.

Screenwriter Simon Kinberg takes some liberties with the plot details (for example, Kitty Pryde is the one who travels back in time in the comic), but he does it in ways that only die-hard fans of the comics would object to. "Days of Future Past" moves very quickly. The action sequences are thrilling. It is always heart stopping to see familiar settings such as Washington, D.C., go through fictional catastrophes. The scene in which the young Magneto is freed from prison is incredible. Overall, the movie is extremely satisfying from start to finish.

"X-Men: Days of Future Past" is an excellent action movie that uses all the strengths of the X-Men franchise to its advantage. Working with a riveting back-story, the film moves along at a fast pace and provides numerous unexpected twists and turns. Singer does a brilliant job of blending the characters and provides an utterly enjoyable action experience.