Shia LaBeouf's Douglas promise

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A non-stop action film starring James McAvoy, Angelina Jolie & Morgan Freeman. Wesley Gibson (McAvoy) is a mild-mannered Chicago office worker until he meets Fox (Jolie), who reveals to him that he's a member of an ancient secret organization called the Fraternity, which kills bad people. Upon learning from Fox that his estranged father has been murdered, Wesley completes training and becomes an avenging assassin.
October 6th, 2010

Shia LaBeouf promised stockbrokers an introduction to Michael Douglas in exchange for trading tips on the set of 'Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps'.

The 24 -year-old actor - who portrays Jacob 'Jake' Moore in the modern-day sequel to the 1987 hit 'Wall Street', alongside Michael's iconic character Gordon Gekko - promised stockbrokers they could meet their "superhero" if they taught him how to trade well, make money and perfect his character.

He said: "I could walk in a room and say, 'Hey, listen, I can be your conduit to your superhero if you give me good information.' They would give me good information, I would introduce them to Michael Douglas or Oliver Stone, so it was kind of perfect for me. I just got the best information because people wanted to come to the set."

Whilst trying to perfect the new role, Shia started trading money provided by the film company so he could learn the ropes and understand the highs and lows of the stock market. He then started trading with funds of his own.

He said: "The only reason I invested was because it wouldn't matter to me unless it affected me personally. To really understand a lot it's not something you can talk about, you've got to experience it."

LaBeouf has also revealed how different his character is Bud Fox, performed by Charlie Sheen in 1987's original.

He told the Metro newspaper: "They are very different human beings. Charlie Sheen came up in the 'boom boom' years. This isn't a character who is indulging in the way that Charlie's character did. That was sort of the sex, drugs and rock'n'roll time in finance, whereas this is a very different time."